3 Advantages of Tektronix’s New Software

The defining mark of today’s new car is multiple electronic systems and devices. With the volume of gadgets, there comes greater complexity. Most high-end vehicles now feature advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS), on-board diagnostics, multiple cameras, and complex information/entertainment systems. No wonder one example of the wiring harness in a high-end luxury vehicle can weigh as much as 110 lbs.

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5 Best Discontinued Tektronix Analyzers

As far back as the early days of wireless communications, designers and engineers have been concerned with electromagnetic interference (EMI). Tektronix has been a leader in designing and producing several series of analyzers to help detect and combat EMI throughout the testing phases of research and manufacturing. Tektronix analyzers are known for their ability to instantly scan broad spectrum spans and display easy-to-read test results for better overall EMI detection.

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6 Best Discontinued Tektronix Oscilloscopes

Tektronix is a globally-recognized source of equipment for engineers, scientists, and technicians. Known for their innovative measurement technology, they have created tools like oscilloscopes that have aided in the advancement of fields like health, communication, and space science. There are new discoveries in science and technology virtually every day, so it’s imminent that what used to be some of the company’s greatest products are replaced with newer, upgraded models. But just because they’ve been replaced doesn’t mean they’re forgotten. Here are some of the best discontinued oscilloscopes from Tektronix.

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Understanding Specifications Part 2

To prevent interference on receiving apparatus, for example, audio and TV receivers or computer systems, signals generated in the line supply and the radiated electromagnetic field of radio frequency from electrical equipment may not exceed certain limits. For this, the IEC makes recommendations. A special committee of the IEC, the CISPR (International Special Committee on Radio Interference), has published several definitions concerning measuring sets and measurement procedures for the various types of interference-producing equipment.

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Understanding Specifications

The 15-MHz portable dual-trace oscilloscope Philips PM 3226 is a compact, lightweight instrument featuring simplicity of operation, for a wide range of use in servicing, research, and educational applications. Other features include provision for chopped or alternate display of Y signals, automatic triggering, mains triggering, and triggering on the line and frame sync pulses of a television signal. The cathode-ray tube displays a useful screen area calibrated into 8 x 10 divisions by an external graticule.

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Measurement Pitfalls

Very often hum is present on the signals under test. This can be easily determined from the screen because the hum is related to the line frequency. If a signal shows a kind of unexpected amplitude modulation, switching back the time-base setting to about 5 to 10 or 20 ms/div, and switching over the trigger source selector to MAINS (or LINE), will generally result in a stable picture in the event of hum.

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Current Probes and Logic Trigger Probes

CURRENT PROBES

Basically, the current probe is a transformer of which the primary winding is the test lead through which the current is measured. The probe head consists of a ferrox-cube core and the secondary windings of the transformer. The core can be split into two parts to clip it simply around the measuring lead. The white-colored part of the probe head can be moved backward and forwards to clip it around the lead. A voltage is developed in the transformer secondary windings by the magnetic field around the measuring lead. This voltage is fed to an amplifier box, the output of which is fed to the oscilloscope. The output cable from the amplifier must be terminated with 50 fl at the oscilloscope end (low-ohmic system for 75-MHz bandwidth).  Furthermore, if the oscilloscope is set to 50-mV/ div sensitivity, the amplifier box provides calibrated outputs ranging from 1 mA/ div on the screen.

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